Hauen und Stechen: Fidelio – Ein deutscher Albtraum in vier Folgen (2018)

SCHWARZ. ЯOTZ. GOLD. STURM.

FIDELIO-EIN DEUTSCHER ALBTRAUM IN VIER FOLGEN nach Ludwig van Beethoven.

Um ihren politisch verfolgten Gatten aus dem Gefängnis zu befreien, arbeitet Leonore undercover als Gefängniswärter Fidelio. Doch nicht nur die Gefangenen, auch das Gefängnispersonal lebt gefährlich: In einem unübersichtlichen Fegefeuer der Folter und der Bürokratie muss es sich zwischen Karriere, Angst und der Hoffnung auf privates Glück zerreißen, während die versprochene symphonische Gerechtigkeit der utopischen Republik auf sich warten lässt. Statt treuer Gattenliebe und einem Schulbuchhumanismus erwarten Leonore in Schwarz-Rotz-Gold-Sturm. Fidelio – Ein deutscher Albtraum in vier Folgen eine lesbische Liebe und große Lust auf Kampf.

In ЯOTZ, dem zweiten Teil der Serie, hüllt sich Beethovens Befreiungsoper in rote Gewänder, um den Leichen aus den Kerkern des deutschen Idealismus auf den Leim zu gehen. Rot ist das Blut der Herrschenden, rot sind die Knöchel der Gerechten und das glühende Eisen, das sich auf ihre Haut presst. Rot ist die untergehende Sonne und das beginnende Fest, bei dem geknutscht und gerauft wird, vielleicht bis zur Revolution. Nach wie vielen Flaschen hört der Glaube an den Rechtsstaat auf? Nach wie vielen Flaschen öffnen wir die Tore der Gefängnisse?

VON UND MIT Musiktheaterkollektiv HAUEN•UND•STECHEN | REGIE Julia Lwowski | DRAMATURGIE Maria Buzhor | BÜHNE Romy Springsguth | KOSTÜME Ingibjörg Jara Sigurðardóttir | VIDEO Martin Mallon | SOPRAN Angela Braun | SCHAUSPIEL Gina-Lisa Maiwald, Wieland Schönfelder | BRATSCHE Louis Bona | SCHLAGWERK Evdoxia Filippou | KLAVIER/ORGEL Roman Lemberg | PERFORMANCE Geoffroy Grison, Tatjana Moutchnik REGIEASSISTENZ Marie Roth | AUSSTATTUNGSASSISTENZ Charlotta Hench | AUSSTATTUNGSHOSPITANZ Jorinde Sturm

Eine Produktion von Musiktheaterkollektiv HAUEN•UND•STECHEN in Koproduktion mit SOPHIENSÆLE. Gefördert im Fonds Doppelpass der Kulturstiftung des Bundes und durch die Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa – Spartenoffene Förderung.

http://www.hauen-und-stechen.com

Brandt Brauer Frick: Gianni (2016)

Martin Butler and Brandt Brauer Frick developed an abstract narrative that sees the cross-section of opera, modern dance, electronic music and fashion. The death of Gianni Versace is at the epicentre, portrayed through the decadent style of 1980s vogueing culture.

The themes are desire and adoration, the promise of youth and beauty, the trappings of power and riches and auguries of unlimited sexual potency. Fashion can be defined as the presentation of the individual in an everyday setting, a presentation in which semblance merges with reality. It is also the international world of runways and supermodels. A designer will be hailed as the high priest of this world if he can promise to fulfil an existential expectation of happiness and do so in a way that appeals to the spirit of the times. Gianni Versace was one such high priest, yet there have been few other cases of star designers where such a meteoric rise has been followed by such an abrupt and tragic end. His path from Calabrian tailor and buyer of fabrics to fashion empire mogul ended with his murder by male prostitute and serial killer Andrew Cunanan outside Versace’s villa on Ocean Drive, Miami.

Director: Martin Butler
Music: Brandt Brauer Frick & Matthias Engler
Set & Video Design: Shan Blume
Costume Design: And Beyond
Dramaturge: Sebastian Hanusa
Choreographer: Susanne Marx

Pythia: Claron McFadden
Medusa/John: Alexander Geist
House Mother: Amber Vineyard
Andrew: Seth Carcio
Dancers & Extras: Alexander Mugler, Fredrik Quinones, Tarren Johnson
Boiler Room broadcast directed by Robert Sieg.

https://boilerroom.tv/recording/gianni-opera-brandt-brauer-frick/

https://www.deutscheoperberlin.de/en_EN/calendar/production/gianni.1082531

Anne Imhof: Angst II (2016)

Angst is an opera in three acts that stretch temporally and spatially over three stations: Kunsthalle Basel, Berlin’s Nationalgalerie – Hamburger Bahnhof and La Biennale de Montréal are presenting three exhibitions with the work of Anne Imhof in 2016 that, like three acts, are linked to one another. A first act was presented by the artist in June 2016 at Kunsthalle Basel. Angst II in Berlin forms the climax and turning point of this work complex. Anne Imhof will conclude the series of works with a third part that she will develop for La Biennale de Montréal. At Hamburger Bahnhof, the artist will present a pictorial composition for a limited time for ten days, consisting of music, text, sculptural elements and actors, falcons, and controlled drones that will form an overall picture.

Angst II divides the historic hall of Hamburger Bahnhof with a tightrope and a dense fog makes the architecture blur. The music of the piece embraces the entire exhibition space and subjects the painting to its own rhythm. While in the act at Kunsthalle Basel songs appeared as arias in a rather temporal order and the march, waltz, and ballad took on a role, the musical composition at Hamburger Bahnhof is played over individual systems. These spatial sound elements evoke memories of the stage set up of a rock concert or the house PA system. The pieces of music in Angst II were written especially for this act and support the work sometimes in a violently surrealist, comical way, sometimes very quietly. The compositions are primarily written for chorus, yet they are not sung by voices. They are segmented in their single tracks, played using the mobile telephones of the dancers, their sound is amplified by microphones that the dancers wear, and combine through the movements of the actors to form an orchestral whole. A tightrope walker crosses the semi-dark space like a clock that ticks and provides the pulse of the piece.

http://www.smb.museum/en/exhibitions/detail/anne-imhof-angst-ii.html

Laila Skovmand: AquaSonic (2016)

The AquaSonic underwater concert by Between Music, takes the audience on a unique and fascinating voyage into uncharted territory. Equipped with custom-made underwater instruments four musicians and singers submerge themselves completely in water in each their man-sized water tank. From the watery depths they deliver visual performance, art installation and concert in one; from silent warm waves of euphony to ocean-like deep rumbling, and roaring soundscapes of another world.

The groundbreaking work of getting a four piece band to play and perform under water highlights the deeply passionate and slightly mad inventor mindset that drives Between Music. The creation of the work has required years of experimentation and countless test-runs in close collaboration with everything from dedicated deep-sea divers to imaginative instrument makers and brilliant scientists -people driven by the same urge to break new ground and challenge existing worldviews. This has led to the development of a number of highly peculiar underwater instruments such as hydraulophone, violin, electromagnetic harp, chimes and percussion, as well as a distinctive vocal technique for underwater singing. The result is a concert experience out of the ordinary; a deep dive into a compelling visual universe and a new world of sound. It is organic, raw, aesthetic – and deeply original. AquaSonic is brimming with curiosity and fascination with the unknown that permeates the water tanks and waves in over the audience.

composition & play: Laila Skovmand
performance: Robert Karlsson, Morten Poulsen, Dea Maria Kjeldsen, Nanna Bech
light design: Adalsteinn Stefansson
sound design: Anders Boll
production: Between Music, FuturePerfect Productions

May 27th-29th, 2016, Opera Days Rotterdam

http://www.aquasonic.dk
https://www.operadagenrotterdam.nl/en/programme/events/aquasonic

Trond Reinholdtsen: The Norwegian Opra (2015)

“I can’t even seem to remember what my project was. I don’t remember what I was trying to investigate or what my research questions were. At the moment, I totally lack interest in it. Some composers and artists never get tired of revising and documenting and promoting and re-performing old works. I just feel dirty when I think about it. After every little premiere I always try to forget what happened. The project “The Norwegian Opra” did have some kind of power when it was still alive, I guess, and the performances and the intense production periods had their own and logic, but I failed to do much reflection underway. It is not a project suited to any critical reflecting. It was all very un-intellectual. I must have been at my intellectual low point during these years. It was more some kind of sustained panic action. Maybe it was a kind of illness more than an academic art project. Now I only have a strong feeling of shame and disgust and that is probably an impossible point of departure for a reflection on the work. I even have put myself in a situation where I have to write in English2, which is a language I have no feeling for. I already sense that each sentence is too short and the rhythm becomes primitive and rigid. It is a poor man’s Hemingway. It is the language of capitalism, imperialism and pop music. I hate the sound and the looks of English. How can anyone reflect about anything in such a language – the Mördersprache of today’s world?”

http://www.thenorwegianopra.no/

Ted Hearne: The Source (2014)

Ted Hearne’s piece The Source is an oratorio for four singers and a band of seven musicians.

The subject is Chelsea Manning, the US Army Private who infamously leaked hundreds of thousands of classified documents to WikiLeaks.
The text, culled and arranged by librettist Mark Doten, sets Manning’s words and sections of the classified material now known as the Iraq and Afghanistan War Logs.

The Source was premiered at the BAM Next Wave Festival in a Beth Morrison Production directed by Daniel Fish.

http://www.tedhearne-thesource.com/

Brian Irvine: I Just Sell My Bananas (2014)

from Things We Throw Away – Five short operas by Brian Irvine (music) and John McIlduff (text) inspired by life on the streets of Dublin.

I Just Sell My Bananas
No tales to be told, no songs to sing, she just sells her bananas. She has kids to take care of, and a husband. Day in day out on the streets of Dublin. The bananas, however, are relentlessly cheerful. They sing with a jazzy Latin pazzaz…

Cast:
Sylvia O’Brien (Banana Lady)
Sarah Shine (Banana 1)
Rachel Croash (Banana 2)
Maria Kelly (Banana 3)

http://www.wideopenopera.ie/event/things-throw-away/

http://www.brianirvine.co.uk/

 

Lina Lapelytė : HAVE A GOOD DAY! / GEROS DIENOS! (2012)

The opera by Lina Lapelytė focuses on the inner lives of cashiers in a shopping centre: showing what lies behind their mechanical “Good afternoon!“, “Thank you!“, “Have a good day!”, and fake smiles. Faceless, robot-like shop workers found in everyday life are transformed into unique and lively characters. Their secret thoughts and biographies are turned into short, personal dramas. The characters of different sales clerks, embodying universal archetypes, convey the predominant social landscape. The libretto is a revealing mosaic of spoken, literary language and documentary.

The atmosphere of the supermarket is established through the glimmering and buzzing installation of daylight lamps and environmental sounds, connecting the audience to the stage and the 10 cashiers. The set itself is very minimalistic. Real goods – the recognizable décor of a shopping center – exist only in acoustic and verbal form.

The monotonous beep of each item being scanned is a key sound through the whole opera. It gets louder and quieter, but it is always present. Songs that accompany the beeping are as monotonous as the process of shopping and selling. Instead of becoming the main point of the opera, music serves the thoughts of the cashiers – it facilitates their voice.
To avoid any moral or condemnatory suggestion, a critical attitude towards capitalism is expressed through humor, paradox, irony and poetry. The mosaic of different destinies is transformed into one poem suggesting the pleasure of consumption.

HAVE A GOOD DAY! / GEROS DIENOS!
Opera for 10 cashiers, supermarket sounds and piano
Work by Vaiva Grainytė, Lina Lapelytė, Rugilė Barzdžiukaitė
Produced by OPEROMANIJA

Librettist Vaiva Grainytė
Composer and music director Lina Lapelytė
Director and set designer Rugilė Barzdžiukaitė
Costume designer Daiva Samajauskaitė
Lighting designer Eugenijus Sabaliauskas
Sound director Arūnas Zujus
Producer OPEROMANIJA

Cashiers: Lina Dambrauskaitė, Liucina Blaževič, Vida Valuckienė, Veronika Čičinskaitė-Golovanova, Lina Valionienė, Rima Šovienė, Milda Zapolskaitė, Rita Račiūnienė, Svetlana Bagdonaitė, Kristina Svolkinaitė
Security Guard: Kęstutis Pavalkis (piano)
Lina Lapelytė (live electronics)

www.haveagoodday.me
http://www.linalapelyte.com/

Judith Egger: Bardo (2012)

“Mystic, enigmatic and visually stunning: This is how Judith Egger’s performance “Bardo” can be described. Circling around states of the in-between and of transition, the term “bardo” refers to the Tibetan Book of the Dead (Bardo Thodol: “Liberation Through Hearing During The Intermediate State”), a collection of Buddhist sutras from the 8th century. The text focuses on the interval between death and rebirth in which different states of consciousness are achieved. These “gaps” or phases of uncertainty can not only be experienced after death but are an essential part of life itself.
Judith Egger establishes three-dimensional miniature settings in her oral cavity – a sensitive place between inside and outside where not only breath and sound leave the body, but communication is generated. The open mouth becomes a stage, a theater revealing various scenes. These will be accompanied live by Munich-based composer and musician Axel Nitz and transferred onto the big screen by cinematographer Maria Rilz. Thereby, sounds from the interior of the artist’s mouth will be integrated into the performance.
Although the miniature architectures placed inside Judith Egger’s oral cavity appear to be deserted and rather static, the flickering of a TV set in a living room and the sushi conveyor belt at a restaurant show some movement. The foaming froth inside a cave refuses stagnation as much as the sparkling water of a fountain symbolizes the circle of life. The artist creates moments of contemplation and tranquility through different scenes anticipating change at the same time. What happens beyond these intermediate spaces remains uncertain.”
Text by Nadine Seligmann

http://www.judithegger.com/bardo.html

Wolfgang Mitterer: Massacre (2003)

Based on Christopher Marlowe’s drama »The massacre at Paris«, Wolfgang Mitterer paints an acoustic picture of destruction, conspiracy and the thrill of power. His protagonists virtually rid themselves of their identities, turning into typological representations of different points of view. The concrete electronic sounds used by the composer throughout the score as realistic sprinklings push aside the historical dimension and fragment the chronology of the narrative. The ensemble follows the score, which uses a graphical notation so as to leave the musicians room to find their own expression. A highly intense experience!

»Mitterer belongs to the long line of composers for whom music is not transcendental, whose music neither knows, nor searches for, the prophetic hereafter of eternal joy. His music plays on this side of heaven, in the run of the mill, resounding in the deaf stone of the earth, there where – putting an end to divine judgement – “there is a stink of being” in the words of Antonin Artaud.« (quote from the booklet by Stéphan Roth)

Taken from https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/complete_catalog/massacre

“massacre” / nora petročenko, elizabeth calleo, valérie philippin, jean-paul bonnevalle, lionel peintre
remix ensemble, peter rundel
2008 live recording: théâtre de saint-quentin-en-yvelines / paris / by dominique bataille
joint production: T&M-paris, casa da música, festival musica strasbourg
released: col legno

World premiere 2003 at Wiener Festwochen.

www.wolfgangmitterer.com